https://nova.newcastle.edu.au/vital/access/ /manager/Index ${session.getAttribute("locale")} 5 Maternal use of folic acid and other supplements and risk of childhood brain tumors https://nova.newcastle.edu.au/vital/access/ /manager/Repository/uon:21562 Sat 24 Mar 2018 07:59:02 AEDT ]]> Folate pathway gene polymorphisms and risk of childhood brain tumors: results from an Australian case-control study https://nova.newcastle.edu.au/vital/access/ /manager/Repository/uon:27952 T, MTHFR 1298A>C, MTRR 66A>G, MTR 2756A>G, MTR 5049C>A, and CBS 2199 T>C). Maternal folic acid use was ascertained via questionnaire. ORs were estimated using unconditional logistic regression. Case–parent trio analyses were also undertaken. Results: There was weak evidence of a reduced risk of CBT for the MTRR 66GG genotype in the child or father: ORs 0.71 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.48–1.07]; 0.54 (95% CI, 0.34–0.87), respectively. Maternal prepregnancy folic acid supplementation showed a stronger negative association with CBT risk where the child, mother, or father had the MTRR 66GG genotype (Pinteraction = 0.07, 0.10, and 0.18, respectively). Conclusions: Evidence for an association between folate pathway genotypes and CBT is limited in this study. There was possible protection by the MTRR 66GG genotype, particularly when combined with maternal prepregnancy folic acid supplementation; these results are novel and require replication. Impact: The possible interaction between folic acid supplementation and MTRR 66A>G, if confirmed, would strengthen evidence for prepregnancy folate protection against CBT.]]> Sat 24 Mar 2018 07:38:45 AEDT ]]>